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NSCLC Market Feedback

By now you've seen post-ASCO QuickPolls in melanoma and GU cancers, and in between we ran a blog on some recent compelling clinical news in NSCLC. Following up on the NSCLC news, we think it is a good time to present QuickPoll outcomes in NSCLC. QuickPolls are a first glimpse into physicians’ reactions to new data presented at ASCO ’11. OBR and MDoutlook are pleased to share results from MDoutlook’s 4th annual post-ASCO survey fielded among its global network of 52,000 cancer physicians.

Introduction:

Quick Poll Methodology and Respondents’ Geographic Distribution

  • 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting was held in Chicago, IL. June 3-7, 2011
  • NSCLC Quick Poll was launched by email in the afternoon of Wednesday, June 8, 2011

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    This is part of series of 4 ASCO Quick Polls: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), GU (prostate and renal) cancers, GI cancers, and Melanoma
  • Sent to global distribution of Medical Oncologists and clinicians with a clinical interest in NSCLC
  • Data taken on June 15th with 124 complete responses
  • Over 1/2 of responses from USA
  • Responses received from 20 different countries in total
  • No financial incentives provided for participation

Survey Results:

1) NSCLC Treaters Plan Increased Usage of Erlotinib While Decreasing Usage of Platinum Based Chemotherapy

Conclusions

  • In the next year a majority of patients with metastatic NSCLC who have EGFR mutations will receive erlotinib
    • Usage of erlotinib is higher in the US than Ex-US
  • Usage of platinum based chemotherapy will decrease in the coming year
    • ~30% of patients will receive chemotherapy
  • Mostly similar results across geographic regions

2) Large Proportion of Clinicians Plan to Always Use Crizotinib EML4-ALK+ NSCLC patients

Conclusions

  • Overall, respondents indicate they will often or always use crizotinib for their appropriate NSCLC patients
    • Over 50% of clinicians in the US plan to always use
    • 40% for clinicians in Ex-US countries
  • Very few clinicians plan to rarely or never use crizotinib for their EML4-ALK+ NSCLC patients

3) Anti-c-Met Combination Therapy is Expected to Have a Positive Impact on Treatment of c-Met+ Patients

Conclusions

  • Over 50% of Ex-US clinicians find new data on combination therapy with anti-c-Met to be of high clinical importance
  • Largest proportion of US clinicians find new data to be of medium importance
  • Very few clinicians find new data to be of low or very low importance

4) Screening of NSCLC Patients for c-Met Mutation is Expected to  Increase Dramatically in the Near Future

Conclusions

  • Currently, the vast majority of NSCLC patients are not tested for mutations of c-Met
    • Only about 5% of patients are currently tested
  • In the next 12 months US clinicians plan to test close to 30% of their NSCLC patients; close to 40% for Ex-US clinicians
    • ~500% increase in testing for both US and Ex-US NSCLC patients
  • Testing for Met mutation will be slightly more prevalent outside of the US

Overall Conclusions:

  • Close to half of all respondents attended the 2011 ASCO annual meeting
  • US and Ex-US clinicians had roughly similar levels of attendance
  • News from ASCO impacts the entire oncology community
  • A variety of sources are used by the non-attendees to learn about the important news
  • Usage of erlotinib in metastatic NSCLC with an EGFR mutation will increase in the next year
  • A majority of these patients will receive erlotinib
  • Usage of crizotinib for NSCLC patients with EML4-ALK mutation expected to be the standard of care
  • ~1/2 of US clinicians will always use crizotinib for this patient population
  • Targeting c-Met in patients resistant to anti-EGFR therapy is anticipated to have a large impact in the future treatment of NSCLC patients

Final Thoughts:

Quick polls are a fast way of measuring expected acceptance of clinical data post major medical meetings, and perhaps can be used to make some assumptions about adoption amongst providers.  In today’s information hungry environment, the speed at which these polls can be conducted and analyzed can be advantageous for market planning and “pressure testing” acceptance of data amongst key stakeholders.

Close to half of all respondents attended the 2011 ASCO annual meeting

US and Ex-US clinicians had roughly similar levels of attendance

News from ASCO impacts the entire oncology community

A variety of sources are used by the non-attendees to learn about the important news

Usage of erlotinib in metastatic NSCLC with an EGFR mutation will increase in the next year

A majority of these patients will receive erlotinib

Usage of crizotinib for NSCLC patients with EML4-ALK mutation expected to be the standard of care

~1/2 of US clinicians will always use crizotinib for this patient population

Targeting c-Met in patients resistant to anti-EGFR therapy is anticipated to have a large impact in the future treatment of NSCLC patients

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